Safari FAQs

You can also download our FAQs and Safari Packing List here.

How long should we stay for?

To allow enough time to relax, enjoy activities and get the feel for a place; at least 3 nights is recommended at any one destination. We particularly like beach and bush safaris as well as combining different national parks.

Can you arrange flights and transport in Tanzania?

Yes, flying is the quickest and most comfortable way to get around. Driving is cheaper and you get to see more of the country but you can lose a lot of time. This and the standard of accommodation you choose are the biggest cost elements for your safari. Paul Tickner safaris prefers small camps and lodges that have genuine environmental and community commitments. 

Isn't southern Tanzania really expensive?

It's a myth that the Southern Circuit in Tanzania is really expensive. We also organise safaris in northern Tanzania, why not combine the north and south?

What's the climate like? 

In southern Tanzania it rains approximately November-April. This time of year is very lush and beautiful, there are lots of birds around and many camps and lodges operate at low season rates. Dry season from May-October is high season, there are more tourists around but the game viewing is at its best. Northern Tanzania is much the same but with more of a pronounced separation between the short rains of November and December and the long rains of March and April (short and long read light and heavy). On safari it can get chilly in the evening and on open vehicles in the morning. At the coast it's humid all year round, conditions are more dependent on the wind. For special activities like scuba diving or whale shark watching, certain times of year are much better than others.

What insurance do I need?

Paul Tickner Safaris insists that you get comprehensive travel insurance before travelling. This should cover you in case of a medical emergency, also look for clauses on baggage loss and missed flights. Emergency evacuation cover with the Flying Doctors (AMREF) comes as standard with all our safaris, they will fly you out to an appropriate hospital from the nearest airstrip. You should supply us with your insurance details, contact information, passport number and next of kin contacts. In Tanzania you will have our phone number for emergency use. 

Do we need to get any vaccinations? What about general health and eating?

Make sure you get your vaccinations and anti-malarials sorted out well in advance. You will need to contact a travel nurse, remember you need to start taking prophylaxis sometimes weeks before you leave and for a while after you return, be aware of side effects. Malaria is particularly prevalent in the coastal regions. Prevention is better than cure so wear long trousers in the evenings. Citronella based insect repellents work best, or Peaceful Sleep, both of which are available in Tanzania. It's a good idea to bring a small first aid kit with you: paracetamol, ibuprofen, ciprofloaxin, re-hydration salts... 

THERE IS NO EBOLA IN TANZANIA!

We try to limit the use of bottled water but it's often the only drinking water available. Tap water is fine to brush your teeth with but is sometimes distasteful from boreholes at bush camps. At hotels and camps you will be eating well prepared food and it's ok to eat the salad. If you eat somewhere else we can't offer any guarantees. 

Do not underestimate the heat and the sun. Wear a hat, plenty of sun-cream and avoid over exertion during the middle of the day. Drink lots of water. Going on safari is tiring, you're on holiday, take a siesta.

Do I need a visa?

Yes, get your visa before you leave and save yourself a lot of time at Dar es Salaam airport. Contact the nearest Tanzanian embassy. Alternatively we can arrange for someone to help you and your group through the visa process at the airport.

Will my phone work, is there any WiFi?

Your mobile phone will usually pick up a local Tanzanian network, or speak to your provider about roaming, it will be expensive. It's just as easy to buy a Tanzanian sim card and/or handset. Wifi is increasingly available in Dar and Arusha, otherwise don't expect it.

What about cash?

Contact your bank and make sure your credit/debit cards will work in Tanzania before you leave. It usually works out better to withdraw money on arrival. You really won't need much out on safari, just for drinks bills, tips and buying local arts and crafts. Dollars are handy for paying for extra activities. Most tourist places accept dollars and Tanzanian shillings. Have a rough idea of exchange rates before you leave. You can pay national park fees by card only, although most of the time we do this for you. Don't expect to be able to pay by credit card outside of Dar es Salaam or Arusha. 

What do you recommend for tipping?

Reward excellent service and guiding, $10/day is a standard tip, more if there are more of you and so on. There is no need to tip everyone, if someone is aggressive in wanting to carry your bag, be equally assertive in saying no. Remember to haggle when buying arts and crafts, don't compare prices to USD or GBP, this leads to inflated prices. Buy from the producers, women and artisans, not the pushy middlemen. 

Photography tips?

Point and shoot cameras are great for people and landscape shots, some of them also film well. They take very good pictures for affordable prices and work well in combination with a DSLR, for those who are looking to get some really good wildlife and scenery shots. 

Don't worry about your DSLR body too much, spend your money on the best lenses you can afford. Check that they are compatible with each other. For most wildlife and birds, you are going to need at least 300mm.

Learn how to use your camera, think about light and composition, shutter speed, aperture, ISO and how they work together. Buying a swanky camera is not going to help you if you are unsure about these things and it is no substitute for practice. 

Think about how you are going to carry your camera(s) around, they will get knocked around in dusty vehicles. It is well worth picking up a quality bag to house your expensive kit.

Camps and lodges will have power in the evenings so you can bring your laptop to edit pictures if you like. Bring plenty of batteries, memory cards and usb/hard drives to back up your photos. Losing pictures is the worst!

Tripods can help you in camp, but otherwise they might be too bulky and unnecessary for driving, but essential for filming. You should be able to use your camera handheld, beanbags can help to rest your lens, lens filters are a useful way to combat the strong light, keep out the dust and protect your lens while getting bumped around in the 4x4. 

Sometimes it is nice to leave the camera in the bag and just enjoy the moment!

More photography tips at our blog

Is it worth bringing some binoculars?

Invest in a decent pair of binoculars, it will really enhance your wildlife viewing experience, and you will be able to see what I mean when I am jabbering about "that bird over there"! As with a lot of things the more you pay for binoculars, the better they are likely to be, that doesn't mean you need to spend a fortune. That said avoid buying a cheap pair as they will be more annoying than anything. Roof prism 8x42, 10x42 or 10x50 are ideal.

Any recommended reading?

Good field guides and books make great preparation and accompaniment for your safari, here are a few to get you started: 

  1. Birds of East Africa, Stevenson & Fanshawe
  2. The Kingdon Field Guide to African Mammals, Jonathon Kingdon
  3. Bradt Tanzania Safari Guide, Phillip Briggs & Chris McIntrye
  4. Sand Rivers, Peter Matthiesson
  5. Ruaha National Park An Intimate View, Sue Stolberger

Anything else?

Don't forget chargers and spare batteries for your electrical kit, especially cameras and phones. Tanzania uses UK style 3-pronged plugs. 

Avoid packing suitcases if you can, soft-shelled bags are much better for fitting in small planes, 4x4s and being carried. Remember it's dusty and bumpy on safari so pack accordingly. 

Resist the urge to buy a bunch of special safari clothes, they are not special and they are expensive. Bring something decent for the evenings, neutral coloured, comfortable clothes work best on safari. A sun-hat and sunglasses are essential. 

You must bring some hard soled shoes if you are doing any bush walking. 

Respect local customs, gents keep your shirt on and ladies cover up your knees and shoulders, especially in the Islamic coastal destinations. 

Try and learn a little Swahili, it goes a long way.

In Tanzania, sometimes things don't go as planned, things run on Swahili time, try not to let it bother you too much.

While we are organising your safari, ask lots of questions, this is how we can match up your expectations with what is on offer. When you get here, keep asking questions, especially when out on safari!

Write a blog about your trip, with lots of pictures, and send it to us!

 

Safari Packing List

Clothes

When you are out in the wilderness bumping around in a 4x4 or tramping through the bush you will need old neutral coloured clothing. Make sure it’s loose and comfortable and no loud colours that will scare off the animals. Generally try and resist buying any special new outdoor clothing.

Obviously it’s going to be hot but depending on the time of year, it can get pretty chilly in the evenings and mornings so bring a sweater or fleece (especially June- August). In the wet season you will need a waterproof (Nov-April).

Shorts are fine during the day but you will need something to cover your ankles against mosquitoes in the evenings.

Ladies need to remember that in towns and villages especially by the coast it is respectful to cover up shoulders and knees.

A good sun hat is absolutely essential as are a pair of comfortable, strong lightweight shoes.

Flip flops are great around camp and don’t forget your swimming stuff. Open sandals or reef shoes are really handy at the beach.


Odds & sods

Malaria prophylaxis

Small medical pack; including painkillers, cyprofloaxin, antihistamine and re-hydration salts.

Sun cream factor 30+

Sunglasses

Phone + charger

Insurance details

Important phone numbers, written down

Visa (should be in your passport)

Any tickets and vouchers

Camera + good bag + charger

Bank cards (check they will work)

Cash (USD, get some Tz shillings at the airport or hotel)

Insect repellent Binoculars

A good book and field guides

Small day bag Personal medication


Where possible try to pack with soft bags as these are easier to fit on planes and 4x4s. Remember that the weight limit on domestic small planes in Tanzania is 15kg + hand luggage.

For special activities like diving or climbing please contact us.

 

Got another question? Get in touch here

 

Stay up to date with the latest Tanzania travel information form the UK government foreign office here and the latest health information for Tanzania from the NHS here.

 

 

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